Three Things I Wish I'd Known

I’m a graduate of UVEI’s teaching program, and was a middle school English teacher. I now work with aspiring teachers, and I’m often asked, “What do you wish you had known before taking your first teaching job?” Since I don’t have a DeLorean equipped with a flux capacitor, I can’t change what my 25-year-old self knew before accepting my first position. But I can share what I’ve learned with new and aspiring teachers.

Here are my top three pieces of advice that I share with new teachers – and wish I could have told myself.

  1. Seek feedback - Most schools will assign you a mentor teacher. But these people are often seen by new teachers as the go-to for information like how to use the copier, and what forms to fill out when registering for professional development. Invite that person to watch you teach. Ask for feedback. Schedule a time to sit down with him/her and plan lessons or look at student work together. If your mentor teacher isn’t receptive or available, find someone in the building who is. Some schools even have instructional coaches. Reach out to those individuals early and often.

  2. Beware the faculty room - My first principal asked me if I knew why he liked that the faculty room was windowless, stuffy, and uninviting. Because you’re cheap? I wondered. He wasn’t, so I knew that wasn’t the answer. “So the teachers don’t sit in here too long and complain or gossip.” Genius. But the truth is that some teachers will congregate wherever they can to complain-- about administrators, colleagues, parents, and, most horrifying, students. Don’t engage in this behavior. And know that some teachers will rope you into these conversations wherever they can-- the parking lot, hallway, your own classroom.  

  3. Immerse yourself in the culture of your students - You should, of course, bring your own passions and interests to the classroom. But to earn trust and understanding with your students, the foundation of effective teaching, you need to make their interests your interests. Noticing quite a few #88 shirts in your third period English lit class? Then it’s time to learn some basics about NASCAR racing. Is your second grade class obsessed with cats? Learn about several unusual breeds and bring this information into lessons when possible. It wasn’t until my fifth year of teaching that I finally immersed myself in YA literature. That year, with my principal's blessing, we took a school bus to the nearest movie theater (35 miles away) to see the premier of Twilight. Yes, I even read the Twilight series. Full disclosure: I was kind of enthralled! Students brought up this trip years later as one of their fondest memories of 8th grade.

There’s simply no way to be fully prepared for every challenge that teaching will bring, but a little advice can’t hurt. Any tips veteran teachers want to share? Visit our Facebook and Twitter pages and post your best nuggets of wisdom for new teachers!

Commentary by Kristen Downey

Kristen Downey is UVEI’s Associate Director for Teacher Education.  Her other blogs can be found at:

http://uvei.edu/blog/324-why-we-forget-and-why-it-matters-to-teachers
http://uvei.edu/blog/333-get-that-job
http://uvei.edu/blog/345-inspired-teaching-5-reasons-we-belong-in-the-classroom
http://uvei.edu/blog/346-quit-your-job-start-a-teaching-career-without-fear
http://uvei.edu/blog/348-worryi-about-praxis-here-s-help
http://uvei.edu/blog/350-teaching-keeps-this-career-changer-in-the-moment

You can follow Kristen on Twitter @UVEIconnect